Thomas Lodge: Rosalynde (3335 words)

Context

Sweetest nut hath sourest rind,
Such a nut is Rosalinde …

… a couplet from an exchange during which an anterior text seems to be volatilised away into literary history, analogous to My Fair Lady (1956) delivering Shaw’s Pygmalion (1913) over into the care of specialists. In a scene of superlative comic dialogue (As You Like it, III ii), Rosalind encounters her earlier, less sophisticated self, ‘Rosalynde’, reflected first in Orlando’s laboured rhyming, and then in Touchstone’s effortless and bawdy parody. Charred pages of Thomas Lodge’s Rosalynde float away on the audience’s laughter.

Reading Lodge’s r…

Citation: Booth, Roy. "Rosalynde". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 14 May 2019 [https://staging.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=38945, accessed 09 December 2022.]

38945 Rosalynde 3 Historical context notes are intended to give basic and preliminary information on a topic. In some cases they will be expanded into longer entries as the Literary Encyclopedia evolves.

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