John Cheever: The Swimmer (3847 words)

Context

American literature has been distinguished by short fiction from its inception. The folk-drawn tales of the Hudson Valley of Washington Irving, the probing of psychological interiority in Edgar Allan Poe’s stories, and the examination of Puritan origins in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “articles” identified and portrayed particular elements of an emerging nation. As each author sought to grasp and frame some aspect of a national experience, they tended to focus on a “place” that fascinated them. The range and scope of the massive American nation compelled this kind of concentration, an approach refined and extended notably by William Faulkner in the creation of the Yoknapatwapha county in Mississippi, and with stunning commercial …

Citation: Lewis, Leon. "The Swimmer". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 08 August 2013 [https://staging.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=35047, accessed 14 August 2022.]

35047 The Swimmer 3 Historical context notes are intended to give basic and preliminary information on a topic. In some cases they will be expanded into longer entries as the Literary Encyclopedia evolves.

Save this article

If you need to create a new bookshelf to save this article in, please make sure that you are logged in, then go to your 'Account' here

Leave Feedback

The Literary Encyclopedia is a living community of scholars. We welcome comments which will help us improve.